Sue Ferrari

Sue Ferrari is an award winning artist from South West Victoria whose interest lies in examining inherited textile traditions and recognising the value in the rich history of domestic crafts. Through her work she shows the intimate and significant role that fabric and thread play in our lives and our history.

Developing a unique personal language using fabric and thread Sue produces work that has multiple layered meanings exploring both cultural and personal experience. We are received in cloth, and we leave in cloth, it follows us from the cradle to the grave, inspired by the stories of these beginnings and endings, and the life in between Sue uses stitch as a means to express emotions of life, love, loss, concealment and hidden secrets all of which are encapsulated in her stitched, sewn and assembled works.

In 2007 on completion of a Diploma of Art in Studio Textiles and Design at South West Tafe Sue was the winner of the Peter Lucas Memorial Art Award. Producing a work titled A Mothers Apron Sue took out first place in the National Tertiary Art Prize for Sculpture in 2008.  Returning to study in 2010 Sue received an Advanced Diploma of Fine Art. Regularly showing in group and solo exhibitions and undertaking work on collaborative installations, her work is held in private collections both here and overseas. Sue currently teaches in the Centre for Creative Arts at South West Tafe Warrnambool in the Visual Arts program and takes specialised workshops on a regular basis.

Fabric has its utilitarian necessary purpose in our lives, intimately linked with the human body it gains meaning through use, Sue is interested in the shared social and cultural histories imbedded in commonplace objects..

Contact Details

Email address: sue.ferrari@bigpond.com

Location

Princetown, Victoria, Australia

Sue Ferrari

Princetown, Victoria, Australia

Fabric has its utilitarian necessary purpose in our lives, intimately linked with the human body it gains meaning through use, Sue is interested in the shared social and cultural histories imbedded in commonplace objects..

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