Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

Warakurna: All the stories got into our minds and eyes from the National Museum of Australia

December 2, 2017 - March 18, 2018

WARNING: Visitors should be aware that this page includes names of deceased people that may cause sadness or distress to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Warakurna: All the stories got into our minds and eyes is an exhibition of contemporary paintings and sculptures that document a new art movement emerging from the Western Desert community of Warakurna (a community that lies near the foot of the spectacular Rawlinson Range, 300 kilometres west of Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock).These paintings combine familiar Western Desert symbols and dots witha new, more figurative style, to recreate scenes of everyday life and to tell historical and contemporary stories. The works are the creative vision of a group of artists including Eunice Yunurupa Porter, Judith Yinyika Chambers, Dianne Ungukalpi Golding, Jean Inyalanka Burke and Dorcas Tinamayi Bennett. The Warakurna paintings are not just art, they recount incidents and remember people that have impacted on the artists’ lives.

+ Free entry

+ Audio loop available and wheelchair accessible

+ Suitable for all ages

Story Themes

Ngurrangka-latju nyinarra tjamuku kaparliku ngurrangka. Tjukurrpa ngaparrku-ngaparrku nintira nyuntulu-yan kulira nintirrinytjaku. We are living in our grandfathers’ and grandmothers’ country. We are sharing our stories with you so that you can learn about them – Eunice Yunurupa Porter. To learn more, click here.

Ngaanyatjarra language and the Yarnangu people

The people of Warakurna speak Ngaanyatjarra as their first language and refer to themselves as ‘Yarnangu’.Ngaanyatjarra is a language from the Western Desert, a broad area that stretches across the Western Australian interior, western South Australia and the south-west corner of the Northern Territory.

Warakurna and the Western Desert

Ngaanyatjarra people have strong ties with neighbouring Western Desert groups, including the Pintupi and Pitjantjatjara, who speak dialects of the same language and have a similar contact history. Western Desert people were among the last Aboriginal people in Australia to have contact with Europeans. In the Warakurna area, contact between Yarnangu and Europeans was sporadic until the 1950s. Click here to learn more about the Western Desert Art style.

Artists

Warakurna: All the stories got into our minds and eyes features works from these Warakurna artists. These artists are not just making art, they are recounting incidents and remembering people that have impacted heavily on their lives. For more information on the artists, click here.

Paintings

Warakurna: All the stories got into our minds and eyes features a collection of Western Desert paintings which use a more figurative style to recreate scenes of everyday life and to tell historical and contemporary stories. Many of the works were donated through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program by Wayne and Vicki McGeoch. To see the paintings included in this exhibition, click here.

Objects

A collection of tjanpi (woven fibre) and purnu (carved wood) sculptures, and other objects from the Warakurna community, feature in the exhibition, Warakurna: All the stories got into our minds and eyes. Like the paintings, the sculptural works are dynamic and innovative and make a vital contribution to the life and economy of Western Desert communities. To see the objects included in this exhibition, click here.

Details

Start:
December 2, 2017
End:
March 18
Event Categories:
,
Website:
http://www.thewag.com.au/exhibition/warakurna-all-stories-got-our-minds-and-eyes

Organizer

Warrnambool Art Gallery
Phone:
03 55594949
Email:
gallery@warrnambool,vic.gov.au
Website:
www.thewag.com.au

Venue

Warrnambool Art Gallery
26 Leibig St
Warrnambool, VIC 3280 Australia
+ Google Map
Phone:
+61 (03) 5559 4949
Website:
thewag.com.au